Inspections

All documents pertaining to inspections can be found below. 

10 Reasons Why Units Fail Inspections 

Carbon Monoxide

Housing Choice Voucher HQS Inspection Program

How to Schedule an Inspection

Minimum Standards 

Owner Lead-based Paint Responsibilities

Smoke Detectors 











HOUSING QUALITY STANDARD CHECKLIST
  INSPECTION INFORMATION AND GENERAL GUIDANCE FOR THE PROPERTY OWNER/MANAGER

PROPERTY INSPECTIONS ARE TO ENSURE THAT FEDERAL MONEY IS SUBSIDIZING DECENT, SAFE & SANITARY PROPERTIES

TYPES OF INSPECTIONS: 

  • Initial Inspection - this is the first inspection performed after the Request for Tenancy Approval Form has been submitted to the EPHA office before a lease is signed.
  • Follow-up Inspection - this inspection is performed to re-inspect specific items that were in a failed condition during an earlier inspection, which have since been rectified.
  •  Annual Inspection - A complete inspection of the unit and premises is required once a year if the client continues to reside in the same housing unit.
  •  Special Inspection - usually conducted at the tenant’s request where a landlord is not making a repair.
  • Quality Control Inspection - Each year, 5% of the housing units are randomly selected to be inspected by the executive director as a control mechanism to ensure the HQS inspector is doing a satisfactory job.
  • Weather Deferred Inspection - If an item fails during the winter, such as roof repair or outdoor painting, where it cannot satisfactorily be repaired until the weather improves, repair to those types of items is usually deferred until April 1. 
  • Life-Threatening Fail Items - anytime the inspector finds a condition that is life-threatening, 24 hours is allowed for the repair to be made and inspected.

Normal allowed time for repair and re-inspection is 30 days when items fail during these inspections.

 COMMON FAIL ITEMS FOR YOU TO CHECK BEFORE ANY TYPE OF HQS INSPECTION IS PERFORMED

  •  SMOKE DETECTOR – Is there a working smoke detector within 15 feet of all sleeping areas and one on each housing unit level?
  • CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR – is there a working CO detector within 15 feet of all sleeping areas?
  • BEDROOMS – Is there at least one openable standard-size window for egress, which is also able to be locked? If a window opens by sliding up, does it stay open by itself? Each bedroom is required to have either two working electrical outlets or one working outlet and one permanently installed ceiling light fixture.
  • BATHROOM – Is there either a working exhaust fan or an openable window? If there is an electrical outlet, is it a GFI outlet or protected by a GFI circuit? Check for leaking plumbing and faucets.
  • PEELING PAINT – Is there any peeling paint, inside or outside? This is especially important for households with children 6 or younger.
  • STEPS – Do all sets of stairs inside or outside with 4 or more steps have one permanently installed handrail?
  • FLOORS/FLOORING – Are all floors and floor coverings free of tripping hazards such as being loose at a threshold, holes, rips, or bumps?
  • ELECTRICAL OUTLETS, LIGHT SWITCHES & JUNCTION BOXES – Are the cover plates on all these?
  • WATER HEATER – Is an extension pipe installed on the pressure relief valve within approximately 6” of the floor? Is a gas shut-off valve installed on the gas line at the unit?
  •  FURNACES – Are all furnace covers in place, and is there a gas shut-off valve installed on the gas line at the furnace?
  • WINDOWS/DOORS – Do all windows and doors that can be reached from the ground have the ability to lock? Are they weather-tight, and are the windows free of cracks and breaks?
  • STOVE – Do all burners work? Do gas unit burners ignite on their own when turned on? Are all knobs and burner grates present?
  • ELECTRICAL SERVICE – Is the electrical wiring/service free of hazards, in working order, and are any knockouts missing in the circuit panel, leaving an opening?
  • PLUMBING – Is the plumbing in good working order free of leaks?